Ergonomics and Fatigue

Ergonomics and Fatigue

The X-Deck is extremely popular with aircraft, helicopter, and aviation mechanics. The largest US helicopter maintenance company that works on Robi

nson and Bell helicopters contracted out for most hospitals is a heavy user of the X-Deck safety work platform. At the recent Heli-Expo in Louisville KY we had dozens of maintenance workers approach us and let us know that their lives are significantly better working off of an X-Deck because at the end of the day they are not as fatigued as they had been working off of the bakers scaffold and traditional scaffolding they once had.

This goes hand in hand with a report given to us by the largest military jet manufacturer in the USA. Their Ergonomics and Safety department wrote up a report that there was a 25% reduction in fatigue compared to working off of concrete or steel. The reason for this is the deck of the X-Deck has a little flex and it feels like you are standing on comfort padding. This slight flex is very comfortable for the worker that has to stand up on the work stand for hours on end. At the end of the workers shift, the worker is not going to feel the leg, knee, and back pains they would of felt if they had stood on solid concrete, steel, bakers scaffolding, or any type of ladder.

Another ergonomic benefit to using the X-Deck is it allows the user to comfortably move around once up in the air. They can shuffle their feet, stretch their legs, or otherwise move around. A great feature to the X-Deck is its ability to hold multiple workers at the same time. Because of this, a worker does not have to strain themselves, but rather can get help and have multiple hands on their job at hand.

The X-Deck allows the worker to maintain three points of contact when ascending or descending the stairs. If a worker was to be up in the air and hurt their hand it is still possible to walk up and down the X-Deck hands free. This is impossible to do on any other type of scaffolding – bakers or otherwise.

 

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